County Admits They Inflated Death Toll by 25 Percent

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    As the novel coronavirus pandemic hit our shores in America, no one knew precisely what to expect. And for many, including the political left, they let their worst fears get the better of them. Before long, it was being predicted that we’d lose hundreds of thousands of our loved ones, if not millions. We were told we’d never be able to take off our masks, never go back to work as we knew it, and schooling would likely be online only for the foreseeable future.

    Looking back now, it all seems a bit ridiculous, doesn’t it?

    I mean, yes, the virus can be dangerous, for sure. But it’s not nearly all that it was cracked up to be.

    Additionally, we’re being told that mask mandates, especially double-masking, can actually be dangerous to one’s health. Online schooling doesn’t teach much of anything and shutting down businesses nearly destroyed our economy.

    The only thing that hasn’t changed much is the number of those our nation has lost due to COVID-19. Oh wait, that’s not true either.

    In fact, in counties such Alameda, in the Bay Area of California, the death toll was apparently inflated by some 25 percent.

    Twenty-five percent, that’s one in every four deaths…

    According to county records, Alameda County has reported 1,634 deaths due to COVID. That was until last week when they re-adjusted that number to a much more accurate 1,223.

    So how did this happen?

    Well, according to the county’s Public Health Department and spokesperson Neetu Balram, the county took on a much broader definition of what a COVID death meant than most places in the state and the country as a whole.

    Balram noted that the county had been recording COVID death based on the positivity of a COVID test taken at the time of death. If the patient was positive, the death was classified as a coronavirus-related death on the death certificate.

    However, this led to a grave overrepresentation of COVID-19 deaths. As Balram said, “There are definitely people who died from reasons that were clearly not caused by COVID.”

    In particular, there was one individual who had died in a car accident, receiving severe injuries that no one could sustain, according to the Washington Examiner. And yet, because a COVID test taken at the time of death had a positive result, it was listed as a coronavirus-related death.

    Naturally, there has been criticism of the county’s previous definition and so the inflated death toll number.

    But, as Alameda County’s Health Officer Nicholas Moss says, that was to be expected. He told The Oaklandside, “We knew any change like this would have raised some eyebrows.” However, he notes that this does little to actually change any “policy decisions” for the county.

    “Nothing about this changes our policy decisions now or during the height of the pandemic.”

    The question now will be if any other counties or even states might soon find similar discrepancies in their COVID death toll data. After all, I know this can’t be the only county in the nation to take things a bit too far…

    It was even noted for a time, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC, that such a “broad” definition of a COVID death should be the one taken. Hell, they even said at one point that hospitals and such could use “COVID-19 related” on the death certificate even without a positive test if the patient had the correct symptoms and such.

    It only makes sense then that more liberal-leaning or fearful counties and states wouldn’t have a problem recording COVID-19 deaths based on a positive test or symptoms alone.

    And then, of course, there are multiple rumors surrounding the effectiveness of the COVID tests themselves. What if, in the course of reviewing data as the pandemic continues to subside, we learn that even fewer people died of COVID-19?

    Can you imagine if the nation’s reported COVID death as a whole was forced to be cut by some 25 percent?

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